• January 16th, 2010 - What is the State and Why Should I Care? On the origin and nature of civil society

“He who considers things in their first growth and origin, whether a state or anything else, will obtain the clearest view of them.” -Aristotle, Politics I, 2
In this Crash Course we will examine why mankind has civil societies—states and countries—and why he needs them. We’ll see how the state naturally grows out of the family and for the sake of the family’s perfection; not as an end unto itself. We’ll look at the natural role that citizens have in governing themselves, but at the same time we’ll refute the view that man doesn’t need society. We’ll examine the state’s natural sovereignty and need to protect its territory, and we’ll discuss the moral impossibility of one country being subordinated to another or to a world-wide governing body—as well as the right of citizens to defend themselves when threatened by such a world-wide government.


• January 23rd, 2010 - Democracy or Tyranny? The legitimate and illegitimate forms of government

We’ll refute the view that the only legitimate form of government is democracy and that non-democratic governments are necessarily tyrannical. We’ll examine the three morally legitimate forms of government—monarchy, aristocracy, and democracy—and their three immoral counterparts—tyranny, oligarchy, and ochlocracy or mob rule. We’ll see how one form of legitimate government can slip very easily into an illegitimate form and dissolve citizens’ moral obligations to obey. Comparing the moral forms of government among each other, we’ll ask what form of government is the best, and what form the worst. Taking a close look at democracy, we’ll examine the advantages and disadvantages of a party system.

• January 30th, 2010 - How Far Can the Government Go? On the limits of civil authority

In this Crash Course we examine the relation between public authority and the individual/family. This is the question of governmental interference. We’ll ask whether the state has an obligation to provide for such things as health care and employment; whether the government must provide schools and education as well as whether the government may force schooling on its citizens; whether the government can demand military service and ‘volunteer’ work; whether the government may seize private property for the common good (viz. eminent domain); and other relevant questions. Finally we’ll examine whether citizens are morally obligated to follow all civil laws.

• February 6th, 2010 - Conservatives are Liberals? Classical liberalism and the corruption of the modern state

In this Crash Course we will look at the history of modern democracy. We will see that contemporary ‘conservatives’ are really champions of ‘classical liberalism’—an over-individualistic view of the state which denies its natural role in human perfection. We’ll outline the thought of Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, the Founding Fathers of the U.S., as well as several modern political commentators. We’ll contrast the classical liberal view with the common sense Aristotelian Thomistic view—expanded greatly by Robert Bellarmine and Francisco Suarez—that built the great states of Europe, and we’ll see that the liberal view necessarily corrupts society and man.

• February 13th, 2010 - Is Capitalism evil?

We will examine what capitalism really is by studying the economic elements that make it up, and we’ll ask if these elements are moral or immoral. We’ll examine the peculiar moral contract that exists between capitalists and wage-earners, outlining the rights and responsibilities of each party. We’ll discuss just wages, just prices, the moral lawfulness of monopolies, the conditions of a just strike, the corrosive effects of unjust strikes, the proper and improper understanding of laissez-faire. Though we will see that capitalism is not in itself evil, we will also look at the very real moral dangers in which capitalism places us as individuals and as members of society.

• February 20th, 2010 - What is Socialism?

In this Crash Course, we’ll start by looking at the history of socialism and its modern proponents. Then, we will discuss the nature of socialism as an economic theory of property rights and equality. We’ll study its relation to communism, the most common arguments in favor of it, the practical defects of it in relation to the individual, the family, and the common good, and we’ll refute its underlying theory that property belongs to the community positively. We’ll pay special attention to modern ‘mitigated’ democratic socialism and how it will be implemented. We’ll discuss the natural right to private property, rare legitimate forms of nationalization, and a growing movement called ‘distributism’.


• February 27th, 2010 - What is the Natural Law and How Do I Defend It?
Description coming soon...

• March 6th, 2010 - What is Education? A guide for homeschool parents

This Crash Course is intended for homeschooling families, but is valuable for anyone in the educational field. We’ll discuss the nature of teaching and education, paying close attention to how the human mind develops from sense knowledge to intellectual knowledge. We’ll talk about reasoning and natural discovery; the artistic cooperation of a parent in the child’s continuing perfection; the basic disciplines and the order for learning them based on the intellect’s natural development process; the trivium and quadrivium; ‘great books’ education; the metaphysical goal of natural knowledge and its ordering toward Theology; the moral effects of a sound education.

• March 13th, 2010 - What is a Just War? And What Can’t You Do in One?

In this Crash Course we look at the conditions for a blameless war and the guidelines for conduct in war. We’ll examine offensive and defensive wars, pre-emptive strikes, combatants and non-combatants, direct and indirect killing, enemy property, the concept of ‘total war’, reprisals, peace treaties, snipers, assassination, the atomic bomb, punishment of enemies, and the question of war versus terrorism.

• March 20th, 2010 - The Natural Superiority of Traditional Worship

In this Crash Course we examine the natural religious requirement of worship caused by man’s very rational nature (given to him by God), and what form of worship is more conducive to this nature; of particular interest are the Ordinary and Extraordinary Forms of the Catholic Mass, often called, respectively, the Novus Ordo and the Traditional Latin Mass. We look at the natural obligation of religion founded in man’s essence, along with its expression, which is worship. We’ll examine the connection between the internal and external acts of worship, and which manner of acts is better suited to fulfill the purpose of worship demanded of man. We will then ask whether or not one approach to worship cooperates more with these requirements of man’s nature.


DESCRIPTIONS OF THE REST COMING SOON...
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1 session.
3 hours.
Everything you need to know.
Take a look at the schedule of upcoming Crash Courses:
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The International Society of Scholastics
Sapientis: Crash Course
is brought to you by:
-A small error in the beginning is a large error in the end-
• January 16th, 2010 - What is the State and Why Should I Care? On the origin and nature of civil society

• January 23rd, 2010 - Democracy or Tyranny? The legitimate and illegitimate forms of government

• January 30th, 2010 - How Far Can the Government Go? On the limits of civil authority

• February 6th, 2010 - Conservatives are Liberals? Classical liberalism and the corruption of the modern state

• February 13th, 2010 - Is Capitalism evil?

• February 20th, 2010 - What is Socialism?

• February 27th, 2010 - What is the Natural Law and How Do I Defend It?

• March 6th, 2010 - What is Education? A guide for homeschool parents

• March 13th, 2010 - What is a Just War? And What Can’t You Do in One?

• March 20th, 2010 - The Natural Superiority of Traditional Worship

• March 27th, 2010 - Thumbscrews and Guillotines: on the morality of torture and the death penalty

• April 3rd, 2010 NO CRASH COURSE

• April 10th, 2010 NO CRASH COURSE

• April 17th, 2010 - Is Brain Death Really Death?

• April 24th, 2010 - Is There Such a Thing as a ‘Right to Privacy’?

• May 1st, 2010 NO CRASH COURSE

• May 8th, 2010 - What is Culture and How Does I Gets Me Some?

• May 15th, 2010 - Why Homosexual Marriage is a Contradiction in Terms

• May 22nd, 2010 - The Moral and Immoral Roles of Insurance Companies

• May 29th, 2010 NO CRASH COURSE

• June 5th, 2010 - Is Rebellion Ever Justified?

• June 12th, 2010 - Homeschooling: The rights of parents in regard to education

• June 19th, 2010 - The Devil Made Me Do it: on cooperation in evil

• June 26th, 2010 - Fundamental Issues in Bioethics
More About the Online Classroom and System Requirements
New Crash Courses with special guest lecturers will be added.
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Each Crash Course is 15 dollars (USD) but you can bring as many guests as will fit around your computer!
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THE SAPIENTIS PROFESSORS
Sapientis has several professors presenting these courses. Each professor has a Master's Degree, Licentiate, or Doctorate in Philosophy or a related field. They have all been personally approved by the Society, its board, and its officers for fidelity to Scholasticism.
Biographies coming soon!
Scroll down for a description
of each Crash Course!
Scroll down for a description
of each Crash Course!
Descriptions of the Crash Courses